Broadcasting NBTV

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Broadcasting NBTV

Postby Harry Dalek » Thu Jul 11, 2013 7:42 pm

I know of 2 threads talking about short wave NBTV in 2011 and 2008 ,and seeing the times and frequencies.
Those that have the short wave radios i was wondering if the broadcasts are regular ? i think theres one or 2 examples on you tube of NBTV broadcast and i think from short wave but any one here have any recordings ?

You could just about do another forum for broadcasting i know of Steves Laser Light experiments and mine right at the other end with short distance sound mechanical speaker mic not great but worth a try talk about narrow band width now thats narrow..was trying to see i could see the NBTV letters vertical ....now and again you can make out a letter shape .....
Flying spot scanner is really another type of transmitter receiver ,the first time i tried it looked to me like DXing with the head amp and solar cell at short distance as the signal came in strong and faded out in the snow moving it away from the scanned light..
Attachments
speaker mic.gif
very poor results but this was about the best i got from speaker mic transmitting NBTV letters vertical
speaker mic.gif (196.04 KiB) Viewed 6081 times
Last edited by Harry Dalek on Thu Jul 11, 2013 10:15 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby gary » Thu Jul 11, 2013 8:53 pm

I don't think there are any regular NBTV broadcasts that could be picked up in Australia.

The UK obviously has one, and your post has prompted me to now ask a question I have been meaning to ask for some time.

I am not am Amateur Radio Operator (Ham) so the question may seem a little naive but would the UK broadcasts have an internet relay at all? I think one such system is called EchoLink? I am fairly sure these systems are intended to allow SW reception in areas where the signal could not possibly reach - could be wrong.

I think I am in possession of some recordings of tests of Vic Brown's short wave system between he an Pete Smith.
Perfecting an NBTV system is like trying to slam a revolving door...
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Postby Harry Dalek » Thu Jul 11, 2013 10:13 pm

gary wrote:I don't think there are any regular NBTV broadcasts that could be picked up in Australia.


As i recall its between 3 and 4 mhz yes thats a hard band for that distance perhaps those closer to the broadcasters know ?

The UK obviously has one, and your post has prompted me to now ask a question I have been meaning to ask for some time.


It would just be interesting to know how many join in and what gos on...and why only on that band ? why not a higher better DX frequency.

I am not am Amateur Radio Operator (Ham) so the question may seem a little naive but would the UK broadcasts have an internet relay at all? I think one such system is called EchoLink? I am fairly sure these systems are intended to allow SW reception in areas where the signal could not possibly reach - could be wrong.


Oh it sounds a bit like the uhf relay transmitters the hams used or did in the past more than likely use satellites these days.


I think I am in possession of some recordings of tests of Vic Brown's short wave system between he an Pete Smith.


Was that a one off thing it seems to me with NBTV never been as popular as say SSTV both at one time you had to make the gear where as now NBTV just sort of caught up with SSTV for hams anyway.
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Postby DrZarkov » Fri Jul 12, 2013 1:47 am

You could try this WebSDR at the university in Twente/the Netherlands: http://websdr.ewi.utwente.nl:8901/
You might have sucess there.
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Postby Lowtone » Fri Jul 12, 2013 3:57 am

In which frequencie, and at what time ?
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Postby gary » Fri Jul 12, 2013 10:20 am

DrZarkov wrote:You could try this WebSDR at the university in Twente/the Netherlands: http://websdr.ewi.utwente.nl:8901/
You might have sucess there.


Thanks Doctor! That works well - I'll have a listen tomorrow around 5:30 pm my local time.

From the NBTV web site home page:

"There is an NBTV Net in operation on the 80m Amateur band. Listen on Saturday mornings from 7:30 British Summer/Winter Time on 3.700 - 3.707 MHz for
the characteristic NBTV sound."


I would say there is a reasonable chance to pick that up in the Netherlands?, albeit with a lot of cross-talk I suppose.
Perfecting an NBTV system is like trying to slam a revolving door...
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Postby DrZarkov » Fri Jul 12, 2013 3:35 pm

You can hear many british amateur radio operators on 80 m here (Twente is not that far from here), so it should be possible.
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Postby Harry Dalek » Sat Jul 13, 2013 6:01 pm

DrZarkov wrote:You can hear many british amateur radio operators on 80 m here (Twente is not that far from here), so it should be possible.


Also thank you from me i am having a listen now Wow things have changed from my DX 160 Short wave listening days ! now if i hear NBTV need to record it some way.
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Postby gary » Sat Jul 13, 2013 6:31 pm

Harry Dalek wrote: now if i hear NBTV need to record it some way.


Just use the "What-U-Hear" feature of your sound card (sometimes called "stereo mix").
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Postby Harry Dalek » Sat Jul 13, 2013 7:00 pm

gary wrote:Just use the "What-U-Hear" feature of your sound card (sometimes called "stereo mix").


No luck tonight by the sounds of it 80m band was pretty poor ...
I will have a look ...but no need for it today there was nothing really on the 2 frequencies so far.
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Postby DrZarkov » Sat Jul 13, 2013 9:29 pm

In the meanwhile you can try the Dutch pirate radio scene on the "48 meter band" (from ca. 6200 - 7000 kHz), or on the "x-band", from 1600 to 1700 kHz. It's always like that here. :D
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Postby gary » Sat Jul 13, 2013 9:47 pm

What we need is a software programme to automatically scan and detect NBTV... hmmmm....
Perfecting an NBTV system is like trying to slam a revolving door...
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Postby DrZarkov » Sat Jul 13, 2013 10:12 pm

That should be possible. The software just have to scan for the sync-impulses.

I wonder if anybody is still using DigitalNBTV? http://www.qsl.net/zl1bpu/NBTV/Digital.htm
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Postby Harry Dalek » Sat Jul 13, 2013 10:53 pm

gary wrote:What we need is a software programme to automatically scan and detect NBTV... hmmmm....


It reminds me of the noaa satellite detector i made for the 1200 hz fax tone a band pass filter feeding a 567 pll tone decoder....it would detect the satellite in the snow way before and after you could hear it ...when the satellite was detected the PLL would light a LED and that on signal was used to switch a relay circuit to turn on a tape recorder on for each satellite pass.

I suppose the same thing could be done for the 400hz NBTV sync but my old ways would be a waste these days... Gary a software version would be very interesting ...we know now due to DR Z web SW radio it might be possible to hear the UK NBTV broadcasts ........a streaming tone 400hz detector ?
Go Gary !
The electromagnetic spectrum has no theoretical limit at either end. If all the mass/energy in the Universe is considered a 'limit', then that would be the only real theoretical limit to the maximum frequency attainable.
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Postby Harry Dalek » Sun Jul 14, 2013 6:31 pm

I like DR Z's web radio link better than this but these radios are right in the UK so might be better for a direct 3.7mhz when the NBTV club members transmit ?
you have to log into this site but.

http://beta.remotehams.com/orb.html?id=2186
The electromagnetic spectrum has no theoretical limit at either end. If all the mass/energy in the Universe is considered a 'limit', then that would be the only real theoretical limit to the maximum frequency attainable.
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