Mechanical cameras.

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Mechanical cameras.

Postby Steve Anderson » Mon Jul 23, 2007 3:59 pm

Now then, we've had threads here about display methods, both mechanical and otherwise, recording methods, again both mechanical and not, but unless I'm wrong I haven't seen one posting directly related to a camera. (I'm sure I'll be proven wrong).

I recall in the 80s people were using 913A PMTs as the sensors, now they would be phototransistors or the like. People then weren't scared of a simple little 1000V power supply.

So, lets have a little input into the input part of the chain.

Who was the last person that build a flying snot...I mean flying spot, NBTV camera?

Steve A.

Hehe, stirring things up as usual....
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Postby Panrock » Wed Jul 25, 2007 5:22 am

My colour camera uses 931A's (with an R446 equivalent for the red channel). But this isn't a flying spot device.

I agree that mechanical camera builders seem to be few and far between. The few cameras in existence seem to be part of a camera-monitor combination. I don't recall any stand-alone mechanical cameras at the last convention apart from mine (though I hope someone will correct me).

It's much harder to get good pictures this way than by feeding the monitor with an electronically generated or converted signal - a much more common practice.
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Postby AncientBrit » Wed Jul 25, 2007 5:27 pm

Having seen Panrock's camera in operation at several of the Conventions I am amazed at the quality he has achieved using mechanical scanning.

The pixs don't do justice to the quality of the live device.


Well done,


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Postby Panrock » Wed Jul 25, 2007 6:56 pm

Thanks for the kind words, but personally I wasn't completely happy with how things went at the convention. The colours were somewhat blaring and unsubtle. The lighting conditions (both for viewing and televising) weren't ideal and these are fairly critical for best results - it works better here at home.

Also a lot of people couldn't fuse the stereo images. Next year I think I shall have to make the viewing beam splitter adjustable and maybe add a 'saturation' control to the monitor.

Steve
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Postby AncientBrit » Wed Jul 25, 2007 10:27 pm

Panrock,

"Blaring and unsubtle" ?

Sounds just about right for television!

On a serious note, perhaps for the very small screen an element of over statement (or over correction) is acceptable and necessary.


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Postby Panrock » Wed Jul 25, 2007 11:44 pm

AncientBrit wrote:Panrock,

"Blaring and unsubtle" ?

Sounds just about right for television!


That's all too true today, though hopefully the projected 'British Heritage Television Service' will put that right :wink:. At present, our application is being considered by OFCOM.

AncientBrit wrote:On a serious note, perhaps for the very small screen an element of over statement (or over correction) is acceptable and necessary.


I know what you mean - it all enhances the 'peepshow' experience. For me, with its flicker and bright colours, colour NBTV viewing is reminiscent of seeing my father's old Standard-8mm films, shot on Kodachrome II.

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