Nice SSTV Demo

Forum for discussion of SSTV topics. Slow Scan television (SSTV) is a picture transmission method used mainly by amateur radio operators, to transmit and receive static pictures via radio in monochrome or colour.

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Nice SSTV Demo

Postby Harry Dalek » Fri Sep 21, 2018 10:27 pm

Nice classic monitor tube looks a different shape or may be its just the view finder any case I like the look of it .
Might as well stick a link to my monitor build here as well bit out of place in off topic .
viewforum.php?f=19
Also here a 77 magazine with a bit on sstv at the time
Hrh-11November1977.pdf
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youtu.be/2tIfhI5XQTM
Bit on every thing in this great little book
ImageCommunicationsHandbook.pdf
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The electromagnetic spectrum has no theoretical limit at either end. If all the mass/energy in the Universe is considered a 'limit', then that would be the only real theoretical limit to the maximum frequency attainable.
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Re: Nice SSTV Demo

Postby Steve Anderson » Sat Sep 22, 2018 1:55 pm

Interesting video Harry. Well made unit, PCBs etc., sprayed front panel with neat markings - but no manufacturer's name or logo, (that I could see), so presumably home-made. Only just noticed, the video 'link' does say it's homemade.

The CRT is also quite a rare looking thing, a rectangular faceplate with a P7 phosphor...I can't think of the intended use for these except for SSTV. Modern radars have 'electronic persistence' where the afterglow is generated in RAM and displayed on a standard PC flat screen monitor.

Dr. Ralph Taggart, the author of "The Image Communication Handbook", is a member here but he hasn't posted in a long time, maybe years.

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Re: Nice SSTV Demo

Postby Harry Dalek » Sat Sep 22, 2018 4:12 pm

Steve Anderson wrote:Interesting video Harry. Well made unit, PCBs etc., sprayed front panel with neat markings - but no manufacturer's name or logo, (that I could see), so presumably home-made. Only just noticed, the video 'link' does say it's homemade.


Its a beauty ....Yes also looks well made for a home made monitor if it is i noticed on the viewfinder as he is panning the camera over it it says Hitachi ? was there a Hitachi SSTV monitor ?
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The CRT is also quite a rare looking thing, a rectangular faceplate with a P7 phosphor...I can't think of the intended use for these except for SSTV. Modern radars have 'electronic persistence' where the afterglow is generated in RAM and displayed on a standard PC flat screen monitor.


I noticed in the European builds a few used this shape tube ,but i have never come across one nice to see an example .

Dr. Ralph Taggart, the author of "The Image Communication Handbook", is a member here but he hasn't posted in a long time, maybe years.


Good around book on the subject some good stuff floating around on the net ...i knew it was Ralph but didn't know about this book i liked all of it but the stuff on facsimile is great which tends to be over looked .

I like this rotating drum scanner much neater version than mine a while back ...
ham_sstv.jpg
The electromagnetic spectrum has no theoretical limit at either end. If all the mass/energy in the Universe is considered a 'limit', then that would be the only real theoretical limit to the maximum frequency attainable.
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Re: Nice SSTV Demo

Postby Steve Anderson » Mon Sep 24, 2018 6:37 pm

Many years ago, like about 30, I considered modifying an old daisy-wheel printer into a SSTV scanner. Remove the print mechanism and all the drive electronics, replace print head with light source, lens and photodiode. New gubbins to drive the X and Y stepper motors, and that's as far s it got! The idea was to insert photo instead of plain paper and scan.

It wouldn't have been scanned at SSTV rates, but even in those days scanning at a very slow rate (say a few minutes per photo) then speeding it up in RAM was entirely possible. Even a DOS 286 PC could have quite happily saved the scanned image as a file.

Steve A.

It may have been possible to get the 286 running Qbasic to do it all, control the motors, do the A-D from the photodiode and translate it into a proper SSTV output. But those days have gone...But as I recall, using Qbasic on DOS where timing was critical (TV, SSTV etc.) the interrupts from the OS caused timing glitches... but that's from the deepest and most unreliable part of my memory.
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Re: Nice SSTV Demo

Postby Harry Dalek » Mon Sep 24, 2018 9:38 pm

Steve Anderson wrote:Many years ago, like about 30, I considered modifying an old daisy-wheel printer into a SSTV scanner. Remove the print mechanism and all the drive electronics, replace print head with light source, lens and photodiode. New gubbins to drive the X and Y stepper motors, and that's as far s it got! The idea was to insert photo instead of plain paper and scan.

It wouldn't have been scanned at SSTV rates, but even in those days scanning at a very slow rate (say a few minutes per photo) then speeding it up in RAM was entirely possible. Even a DOS 286 PC could have quite happily saved the scanned image as a file.

Steve A.

It may have been possible to get the 286 running Qbasic to do it all, control the motors, do the A-D from the photodiode and translate it into a proper SSTV output. But those days have gone...But as I recall, using Qbasic on DOS where timing was critical (TV, SSTV etc.) the interrupts from the OS caused timing glitches... but that's from the deepest and most unreliable part of my memory.


Arrr Steve you do have a little touch of mechanical scanning in ya :wink:
Thats an interesting idea using an old or at the time state of the art daisy wheel printer for a a SSTV scanner sounds like you were thinking of feeding it right to the PC for display ..,much harder in those days you to do it all...
Its always on the back of my mind to make a 7 or 8 sec SSTV camera one day ,i am better that sort of thing these days so may come about on my to do list may be i will get there before they rip the soldering iron out of my cold dead hands 8)
Last edited by Harry Dalek on Tue Sep 25, 2018 5:46 pm, edited 1 time in total.
The electromagnetic spectrum has no theoretical limit at either end. If all the mass/energy in the Universe is considered a 'limit', then that would be the only real theoretical limit to the maximum frequency attainable.
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Re: Nice SSTV Demo

Postby Steve Anderson » Tue Sep 25, 2018 12:09 pm

I quite like mechanical work, it's just I don't have the facilities to do it. No lathe, no pillar drill, no mill. Just a standard domestic power drill, a few files and that's about it. I know a lot can be achieved with just that, many have, but me? Hmmmm. I'm sympathetic to the likes of Jeremy Clarkson who swore the only tool he ever needed to fix anything was a hammer. (The BBC car series, "Top Gear".)

Now 3D printing may change all that. Certainly the stuff posted here using 3D printing does look promising, but it is quite an investment, not only the printer but the consumables too. Add to that the software required and the time and effort required to learn how to use it. This old dog is losing its ability to learn new tricks...or perhaps more correctly the desire to do so.

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Re: Nice SSTV Demo

Postby Harry Dalek » Tue Sep 25, 2018 6:04 pm

Steve Anderson wrote:I quite like mechanical work, it's just I don't have the facilities to do it. No lathe, no pillar drill, no mill. Just a standard domestic power drill, a few files and that's about it. I know a lot can be achieved with just that, many have, but me? Hmmmm. I'm sympathetic to the likes of Jeremy Clarkson who swore the only tool he ever needed to fix anything was a hammer. (The BBC car series, "Top Gear".)

Now 3D printing may change all that. Certainly the stuff posted here using 3D printing does look promising, but it is quite an investment, not only the printer but the consumables too. Add to that the software required and the time and effort required to learn how to use it. This old dog is losing its ability to learn new tricks...or perhaps more correctly the desire to do so.

Steve A.


Yes i just have an old drill too for big holes :wink: but do have a dremel tool that comes in handy ..so i can pretty much just drill holes cut things and glue stuff together with my 3rd tool the hot glue gun and that pretty much it , apart from the 4th tool Imagination with out that one nothing happens .
Yes the 3d printer is the way to go or cnc or laser cutter ,i find the same problem with the hobby the will to learn out side the main interest ,when you need a hobby to do a hobby that's little harder for me .. :|
The electromagnetic spectrum has no theoretical limit at either end. If all the mass/energy in the Universe is considered a 'limit', then that would be the only real theoretical limit to the maximum frequency attainable.
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Re: Nice SSTV Demo

Postby Andrew Davie » Tue Sep 25, 2018 10:23 pm

Steve Anderson wrote:Now 3D printing may change all that. Certainly the stuff posted here using 3D printing does look promising, but it is quite an investment, not only the printer but the consumables too. Add to that the software required and the time and effort required to learn how to use it. This old dog is losing its ability to learn new tricks...or perhaps more correctly the desire to do so.


Ender-3 printer, about $250
Filament, $15/kg and that lasts a fair while.
Software: "Cura" - free
Time investment: mmh.... well you do need to learn how to use it properly
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